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An Equilibrium-Adjustment Theory of Current Trends in Administrative Law

This essay began as a response to claims that the argument that Chevron encourages congressional inaction has been refuted by the best available evidence. That Chevron causes such inaction is one of the arguments made by petitioners in Loper Bright. Leading scholars reject the argument. For instance, Chris Walker has called it one of the ... An Equilibrium-Adjustment Theory of Current Trends in Administrative Law

Breaking up Amazon? Platforms, Private Labels and Entry

[This post is the first in an ongoing symposium on “Should We Break Up Big Tech?” that will feature analysis and opinion from various perspectives.] [This post is authored by Randal C. Picker, James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at The University of Chicago Law School] The European Commission just announced that it ... Breaking up Amazon? Platforms, Private Labels and Entry

Doublespeak in the Debate About Rural Broadband Buildout

As Thomas Sowell has noted many times, political debates often involve the use of words which if taken literally mean something very different than the connotations which are conveyed. Examples abound in the debate about broadband buildout.  There is a general consensus on the need to subsidize aspects of broadband buildout to rural areas in ... Doublespeak in the Debate About Rural Broadband Buildout

Navigating the AI Frontier, Part I

The European Union is on the verge of enacting the landmark Artificial Intelligence Act (AI Act), which will—for better or worse—usher in a suite of new obligations, and hidden pitfalls, for individuals and firms trying to navigate the development, distribution, and deployment of software. Over the coming months, we will be delving into the nuances ... Navigating the AI Frontier, Part I

New proposed accredited investor definition specifically for hedge funds

A post on DealBook pointed me to a recent SEC release I missed over the holidays. The proposed rules contained in the release “are designed to provide additional investor protections” with respect to hedge funds. The proposed rules include amendments to Regulation D that change the definition of accredited investor to be applied to a ... New proposed accredited investor definition specifically for hedge funds

Artificial Intelligence Meets Organic Folly

In a May 3 op-ed in The New York Times, Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chair Lina Khan declares that “We Must Regulate A.I. Here’s How.” I’m concerned after reading it that I missed both the regulatory issue and the “here’s how” part, although she does tell us that “enforcers and regulators must be vigilant.” Indeed, ... Artificial Intelligence Meets Organic Folly

Everything is amazing — and no one at the European Commission is happy

Since the European Commission (EC) announced its first inquiry into Google’s business practices in 2010, the company has been the subject of lengthy investigations by courts and competition agencies around the globe. Regulatory authorities in the United States, France, the United Kingdom, Canada, Brazil, and South Korea have all opened and rejected similar antitrust claims. ... Everything is amazing — and no one at the European Commission is happy

The Lasting Legacy of the Amazon-Whole Foods Merger Will Likely Be the Spread of Grocery Tech

The negativity that surrounded the deal at its announcement made Whole Foods seem like an innocent player, but it is important to recall that they were hemorrhaging and were looking to exit. Throughout the 2010s, the company lost its market leading edge as others began to offer the same kinds of services and products. Still, the company was able to sell near the top of its value to Amazon because it was able to court so many suitors. Given all of these features, Whole Foods could have been using the exit as a mechanism to appropriate another firm’s rent.

Google’s India case and a return to consumer-focused antitrust

What happened Today, following a six year investigation into Google’s business practices in India, the Competition Commission of India (CCI) issued its ruling. Two things, in particular, are remarkable about the decision. First, while the CCI’s staff recommended a finding of liability on a litany of claims (the exact number is difficult to infer from ... Google’s India case and a return to consumer-focused antitrust

The Modern Video Marketplace Does Not Need Help From the FCC

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is no stranger to undertaking controversial and potentially counterproductive regulatory projects. The commission’s digital-discrimination proceeding is expected to continue in November, and FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel just announced that the FCC will revive the warmed-over corpse of the 2015 Open Internet Order. This latter item highlights how the FCC’s Democratic ... The Modern Video Marketplace Does Not Need Help From the FCC

Comments on Updating the Merger Guidelines

Of course, the Merger Guidelines need to be updated.  Except for efficiencies, they haven’t been updated in 17 years.   Lawyers and economists with a regular antitrust practice may not require an update in light of their knowledge of the 2006 Commentary, speeches and agency experience.  But, the rest of the antitrust world does.  The most ... Comments on Updating the Merger Guidelines

It’s Not Time To Panic About Amazon’s Purchase of Whole Foods. Yet.

Even with these caveats, it’s still worth looking at the recent trends. Whole Foods’s sales since 2015 have been flat, with only low single-digit growth, according to data from Second Measure. This suggests Whole Foods is not yet getting a lift from the relationship. However, the percentage of Whole Foods’ new customers who are Prime Members increased post-merger, from 34 percent in June 2017 to 41 percent in June 2018. This suggests that Amazon’s platform is delivering customers to Whole Foods.