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Showing results for:  “premium natural and organic”

Premium natural and organic bulls**t

It appears that the FTC is moving to stop the proposed Whole Foods/Wild Oats merger. Says the FTC: If Whole Foods is allowed to devour Wild Oats, it will mean higher prices, reduced quality, and fewer choices for consumers [in the premium natural and organic supermarkets market]. That is a deal consumers should not be ... Premium natural and organic bulls**t

The D.C. Circuit Re-Disappoints in Whole Foods: An Analysis of the Amended Opinions

Being a “glass is half-full” type of guy, I figured there was no way the D.C. Circuit’s decision on Whole Foods’ petition for rehearing en banc could turn out poorly: Either the court would grant the motion and correct the panel’s mistakes, or the court would deny the motion, setting up an attractive opportunity for ... The D.C. Circuit Re-Disappoints in Whole Foods: An Analysis of the Amended Opinions

The premium natural and organic men’s apparel market

Last month the Wall Street Journal raised the specter of an antitrust challenge to the proposed Jos. A. Bank/Men’s Warehouse merger. Whether a challenge is forthcoming appears to turn, of course, on market definition: An important question in the FTC’s review will be whether it believes the two companies compete in a market that is ... The premium natural and organic men’s apparel market

More on Wal-Mart and Organics

An article from yesterday’s W$J sheds some light on the organic community’s anger over Wal-Mart’s decision to begin selling organic products. A few weeks ago, I accused Wal-Mart’s critics of wanting to keep price-sensitive consumers out of the organic “club.� The article in yesterday’s Journal suggests that that’s part of the story, but that the ... More on Wal-Mart and Organics

The unfortunate return of the "strange, red-haired, bearded, one-eyed, man with a limp"

The DC Circuit has reversed the district court in the Whole Foods case.  The opinion is here.  [HT:  Danny Sokol] As regular readers know, we have covered this case extensively on this blog, including most recently this great, lengthy post from Thom on the proper standard of review.  I wouldn’t be surprised if Thom is disappointed with the ... The unfortunate return of the "strange, red-haired, bearded, one-eyed, man with a limp"

Whole Foods Throws in the Towel — Congrats to the FTC!

The witch hunt is over. Last evening, the FTC announced that it would drop its antitrust action against high-end grocer Whole Foods in exchange for the chain’s agreement to sell 32 stores and to give up the rights to Wild Oats’ name. FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz proclaimed that “[a]s a result of this settlement, American ... Whole Foods Throws in the Towel — Congrats to the FTC!

NYT on Preserving the Purity of the Organic Club

The New York Times is worried about Wal-Mart’s plan to sell organic food. One would think that fans of organic would be happy about this development. It means that organic products will be available more cheaply at Wal-Mart, which is planning to sell organic products for just 10% more than conventionally grown food, and it’s ... NYT on Preserving the Purity of the Organic Club

Why Premium Subsidies and the “Employer Mandate” Won’t Solve the ACA’s Adverse Selection Problem

A couple of weeks ago, I argued that the Supreme Court’s decision upholding the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act will ultimately doom the Act to failure. The problem, I argued, is that the ACA’s guaranteed issue and community rating provisions create a perverse incentive for young, healthy people not to buy insurance until they ... Why Premium Subsidies and the “Employer Mandate” Won’t Solve the ACA’s Adverse Selection Problem

The Case Against Google Advertising: What’s the Relevant Market and How Many Are There?

U.S. antitrust regulators have a history of narrowly defining relevant markets—often to the point of absurdity—in order to create market power out of thin air. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) famously declared that Whole Foods and Wild Oats operated in the “premium natural and organic supermarkets market”—a narrowly defined market designed to exclude other supermarkets ... The Case Against Google Advertising: What’s the Relevant Market and How Many Are There?

An Apollo 13 approach to Obamacare

“Houston, we have a problem.” It’s the most famous line from Apollo 13 and perhaps how most Republicans are feeling about their plans to repeal and replace Obamacare. As repeal and replace has given way to tinker and punt, Congress should take a lesson from one of my favorite scenes from Apollo 13. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2YZnTL596Q “We ... An Apollo 13 approach to Obamacare

Kochland: An Inadvertent Paean to the Glories of the Free Market

A recently published book, “Kochland – The Secret History of Koch Industries and Corporate Power in America” by Christopher Leonard, presents a gripping account of relentless innovation and the power of the entrepreneur to overcome adversity in pursuit of delivering superior goods and services to the market while also reaping impressive profits. It’s truly an ... Kochland: An Inadvertent Paean to the Glories of the Free Market

Amazon-Whole Foods: The Speculation Then, the Evidence Today

Carl Shapiro, the government’s economics expert opposing the AT&T-Time Warner merger, seems skeptical of much of the antitrust populists’ Amazon rhetoric: "Simply saying that Amazon has grown like a weed, charges very low prices, and has driven many smaller retailers out of business is not sufficient. Where is the consumer harm?" On its face, there was nothing about the Amazon/Whole Foods merger that should have raised any antitrust concerns. While one year is too soon to fully judge the competitive impacts of the Amazon-Whole Foods merger, nevertheless, it appears that much of the populist antitrust movement’s speculation that the merger would destroy competition and competitors and impoverish workers has failed to materialize.