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The collection of all scholarly commentary on law, economics, and more

Showing results for:  “digital markets act”

"Like A Rain Dance That Produces No Clouds"

My colleague Tom Hazlett, along with George Bittlingmayer and Arthur Havenner, provides some economic wisdom on why they don’t call it stimulus anymore: Counter to the predictions put forward a year ago by the Administration, when it claimed that “more than 90 percent of the jobs created are likely to be in the private sector,” ... "Like A Rain Dance That Produces No Clouds"

A proposed amendment to our Constitution

Ask any conservative what the problem with America is today, and the answer you will get is government spending. But ask that same conservative, or any conservative for that matter, what to do about it, and the shoulders will inevitably shrug. Politicians, including conservatives, simply cannot be trusted when they get control of the purse ... A proposed amendment to our Constitution

Don’t Like the Texas Board of Education’s Brainwashing? There’s a Simple Solution.

Lots of liberals, such as Wall Street Journal columnist Thomas Frank and folks from the Huffington Post and People for the American’s Way’s Right Wing Watch, are all up in arms over the Texas Board of Education’s recent efforts to push Texas’s public school curriculum in a decidedly “conservative” direction. As Todd and Josh noted, ... Don’t Like the Texas Board of Education’s Brainwashing? There’s a Simple Solution.

Barack Obama, financial journalist?

When I was a student at the University of Chicago Law School, our president lectured there. I didn’t take any classes from him — he taught stuff I wasn’t interested in — but I had friends who did; all raved. The other day, I opened up my copy of the Law School directory for reasons ... Barack Obama, financial journalist?

A global warming hypothetical

Global warming critics have taken two primary approaches. First, deny the facts based on the incentives for scientists to fudge the data to get prestige and research dollars (see, for example, the East Anglia emails), based on the inherent limitations of humans to build global weather models to predict the temperature 100 years from now, ... A global warming hypothetical

Options Have Value, Even If DOT Doesn’t Get It

Last week Thom posted about the government’s attempt to hide the cost of taxes and regulatory fees in commercial airfares. Apparently Spirit Airlines is highlighting another government-imposed cost of doing business by advertising a new $2/ticket fee that the airline has imposed. According a CNN report yesterday: Spirit Airlines says a new federal regulation aimed ... Options Have Value, Even If DOT Doesn’t Get It

CEO Vacations and Stock Prices

An interesting looking empirical piece from David Yermack (NYU), Tailspotting: How Disclosure, Stock Prices and Volatility Change When CEOs Fly to Their Vacation Homes.  I haven’t read it closely yet.  Here’s the abstract: This paper shows close connections between CEOs’ vacation schedules and corporate news disclosures. Identify vacations by merging corporate jet flight histories with ... CEO Vacations and Stock Prices

Book Review of Cohen & Wright on Family Law & Economics

From Lucy Heckman: The Research Handbook on the Economics of Family Law consists of a series of essays about perspectives on the commercial relations of human activities outside of the commercial world, specifically marriage and child-bearing.  The work addresses such topics as factors that influence marriage, trends in marital stability, divorce and divorce law and ... Book Review of Cohen & Wright on Family Law & Economics

Abandoning Antitrust’s Chicago Obsession: The Case for Evidence-Based Antitrust

I’ve posted to SSRN an article written for the Antitrust Law Journal symposium on the Neo-Chicago School of Antitrust.  The article is entitled “Abandoning Chicago’s Antitrust Obsession: The Case for Evidence-Based Antitrust,” and focuses upon what I believe to be a central obstacle to the continued evolution of sensible antitrust rules in the courts and ... Abandoning Antitrust’s Chicago Obsession: The Case for Evidence-Based Antitrust

New Article Forthcoming in Yale Law Journal: The Antitrust/ Consumer Protection Paradox: Two Policies At War With One Another

Yale Law Journal has published my article on “The Antitrust/ Consumer Protection Paradox: Two Policies At War With One Another.”  The hat tip to Robert Bork’s classic “Antitrust Paradox” in the title will be apparent to many readers.  The primary purpose of the article is to identify an emerging and serious conflict between antitrust and ... New Article Forthcoming in Yale Law Journal: The Antitrust/ Consumer Protection Paradox: Two Policies At War With One Another

The Economics of Drip Pricing at the FTC

The FTC is having a conference in the economics of drip pricing: Drip pricing is a pricing technique in which firms advertise only part of a product’s price and reveal other charges later as the customer goes through the buying process. The additional charges can be mandatory charges, such as hotel resort fees, or fees ... The Economics of Drip Pricing at the FTC

AALS Section on Antitrust and Economic Regulation Call for Papers: Google and Antitrust

The AALS Section on Antitrust and Economic Regulation call for papers features a topic near and dear to my heart this year: Google and Antitrust.   Here is the announcement: Call for Papers Announcement AALS Section on Antitrust and Economic Regulation Google and Antitrust   2013 AALS Annual Meeting January 4-7, 2013 New Orleans, Louisiana ... AALS Section on Antitrust and Economic Regulation Call for Papers: Google and Antitrust