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Showing results for:  “premium natural and organic”

More on Wal-Mart and Organics

An article from yesterday’s W$J sheds some light on the organic community’s anger over Wal-Mart’s decision to begin selling organic products. A few weeks ago, I accused Wal-Mart’s critics of wanting to keep price-sensitive consumers out of the organic “club.� The article in yesterday’s Journal suggests that that’s part of the story, but that the ... More on Wal-Mart and Organics

Direct public offerings, free writing prospectuses, Vonage, and SOX

Back in 2001 I published an article entitled Going Public Through an Internet Direct Public Offering: A Sensible Alternative for Small Companies? DPOs had been (and continue to be) touted as a financing alternative for a small company that needs capital but can’t attract angel or VC financing or an underwriter to take it public. ... Direct public offerings, free writing prospectuses, Vonage, and SOX

Economic Illiteracy of the Week?

Via Ted Frank at Point of Law, the House has overwhelmingly passed a price gouging bill that will not help consumers, but on the bright side, is likely to provide a fresh example for microeconomics instructors teaching the consequences of price controls. The award for economic illiteracy of the week goes to the whole House, ... Economic Illiteracy of the Week?

NYT on Preserving the Purity of the Organic Club

The New York Times is worried about Wal-Mart’s plan to sell organic food. One would think that fans of organic would be happy about this development. It means that organic products will be available more cheaply at Wal-Mart, which is planning to sell organic products for just 10% more than conventionally grown food, and it’s ... NYT on Preserving the Purity of the Organic Club

Thoughts on the Economics of Lawyer Licensing

Larry Ribstein and Jonathan Wilson have an interesting exchange going regarding the merits of lawyer licensing. Larry actually has several posts on the subject (see, e.g., here, here, and a paper here). WSJ Law Blog has picked up the exchange, and offers a poll which asks the question: “Is Lawyer Licensing Necessary?” (Perhaps unsurprisingly for ... Thoughts on the Economics of Lawyer Licensing

Do Slotting Contracts Harm Consumers?

Warning: shameless plug of my own research to follow! Slotting allowances, or payments for shelf space, have been a central part of my research agenda for the last several years. My work with Ben Klein, The Economics of Slotting Contracts, presents a procompetitive theoretical explanation (and some aggregate data in support of our theory) for ... Do Slotting Contracts Harm Consumers?

Robert Reich on the Massachusetts Health Care Plan

Today’s “Marketplace” program on NPR featured a commentary by Robert Reich (audio available here), in which the former labor secretary sang the virtues of Massachusetts’ new health insurance law. Reich emphasized a couple of times that the Massachusetts plan wouldn’t involve any new taxes. That aspect, he said, might make the plan attractive to the ... Robert Reich on the Massachusetts Health Care Plan

Retirement Benefits and the Lucent/Alcatel Deal

As a merger between Lucent and Alcatel inches closer to completion, Lucent’s retirees worry about what may happen to their benefits. Billed as a “merger of equals,� concerns about Lucent’s retirement accounts have been a speed bump. While Lucent has nearly a $2.7 billion surplus in its three of its pension plans, it faces a ... Retirement Benefits and the Lucent/Alcatel Deal

I look pretty young but I'm just backdated, yeah

The WSJ this weekend has a long piece on the issue of stock option backdating, “The Perfect Payday.” Here’s the tagline: Some CEOs reap millions by landing stock options when they are most valuable. Luck–or something else? It’s an interesting article, much of which is devoted to debunking the assertion that backdating of options grants ... I look pretty young but I'm just backdated, yeah

Are Buyout Funds Appropriating Profits?

Today’s NYT has a sobering article entitled Public Companies, Singing the Blues. The article discusses a question raised by Daniel Loeb, a famous hedge fund manager, at a dinner of buyout kings in Davos, Switzerland (the site of the World Economic Forum). Loeb’s question: “Why can buyout firms take public companies private and make enormous ... Are Buyout Funds Appropriating Profits?

Great. I'm dead, and they're talking about wheat.

Apologies for my relative absence of late: my day job, and all. I know my 3 loyal readers out there (hi Mom!) were wondering about me. Soon, I’ll post more of substance. Meantime, here’s a little chestnut for your bedtime reading pleasure, culled from an article in the Economist. I don’t regularly read the Economist. ... Great. I'm dead, and they're talking about wheat.

Coase and Smoking: Who’s the Victim Here?

Today’s New York Times reports on a new cigarette bar in Chicago, where the city council has just imposed a sweeping smoking ban. (I recently criticized the ban at Ideoblog.) The proprietors of the Marshall McGearty Tobacco Lounge insist that the lounge is permitted because of a loophole allowing smoking in retail tobacco shops. Not ... Coase and Smoking: Who’s the Victim Here?