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Showing results for:  “digital markets act”

Scalping Next

So Alinea’s Grant Achatz has a new restaurant, Next, which is the talk of Chicago and the nation.  You can buy transferable dining tickets which the NYT reports are being traded online up to $3,000.  So now we see that even chefs can be like Hannah Montana. Alinea caps sales at two tables/customer given a ... Scalping Next

More on the Fighting Antitrust Agencies

One additional observation on the WSJ story Paul mentioned.  Much has been written about the strained relationship between the FTC and DOJ in antitrust matters.  There has, of course, never been a more descriptive and entertaining version of these tensions than the one offered by former Chairman and now Commissioner Kovacic who observed that the ... More on the Fighting Antitrust Agencies

The origin of option backdating?

An article in yesterday’s NYT describes the genesis of option backdating at Micrel Inc., a silicon valley semiconductor company: Throughout the 1990’s, Silicon Valley companies were locked in an intense battle to recruit employees, and stock options were their primary tool. * * * So when new hires began complaining that the [Micrel’s] volatile share ... The origin of option backdating?

Shocked: Gasoline Prices Vary Edition

From the Attorney General’s Memorandum to the Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force (HT: Michael Giberson, who is a must read on all issues oil and energy related: Based upon our work and research to date, it is evident that there are regional differences in gasoline prices, as well as differences in the statutory and other ... Shocked: Gasoline Prices Vary Edition

The death of the billable hour?

Jay Shepherd writing on ATL thinks the billable hour is “a dying business model. . . because it focuses on selling the wrong thing. * * * [N]o client in the history of the planet has ever wanted to buy time. * * * It’s what you can do for them during that time.” Shepherd ... The death of the billable hour?

Jets and LBOs

I have written about the disciplinary effect of the uncorporate form, particularly in LBOs.  See, e.g., here and Chapter 8 of my Rise of the Uncorporation. Now here’s more evidence:  Edgerton, Agency Problems in Public Firms: Evidence from Corporate Jets in Leveraged Buyouts.  Here’s the abstract: This paper uses rich, new data to examine the ... Jets and LBOs

Say on pay at the SEC?

Reuters reports on Henry Hu’s somewhat controversial tenure heading the SEC’s new Division of Risk, Strategy and Financial Innovation. The SEC brought in Hu, a widely recognized expert on financial regulation, in response to its embarrassing Madoff failure.  The Reuters article discusses some reservations about how much Hu accomplished, but I want to focus on ... Say on pay at the SEC?

Private equity and financial distress

I’ve written often, particularly in my Rise of the Uncorporation, of the upside disciplinary effect of uncorporate management.  This includes the salutary role of private equity (e.g., this recent post). But detractors argue that private equity-backed leveraged buyouts, by replacing equity with debt, make targets vulnerable to the disruption of bankruptcy.  A recent paper by ... Private equity and financial distress

AALS Call for Papers on Behavioral Economics & Antitrust Law

Call for Papers Announcement   AALS Section on Antitrust and Economic Regulation AALS Section on Law & Economics   Behavioral Economics & Antitrust Law   January 5-8, 2012 2012 AALS Annual Meeting Washington, DC   The AALS Section on Antitrust and Economic Regulation and the Section on Law & Economics will hold a joint program ... AALS Call for Papers on Behavioral Economics & Antitrust Law

The whistleblower rules and insider trading

The SEC has adopted Dodd-Frank whistleblower rules (see Law Blog story) which have sparked controversy because they award bounties without requiring use of internal corporate reporting mechanisms. Whistleblower organizations are happy, corporations not so much. It’s a good time to remember my proposal last year to let the whistleblowers trade: The beauty of the insider ... The whistleblower rules and insider trading

Do Any (Other) Law Schools Have A Dominant Paradigm?

An exchange between Ethan Leib at Prawfsblawg and Kate Litvak in the comments to Ethan’s very interesting post on political science in the academy raises some interesting questions about the status of law and economics in the legal academy. Ethan kicks off the exchange by noting that: “[Y]ou’d have to be blind to ignore that ... Do Any (Other) Law Schools Have A Dominant Paradigm?

The uncorporate solution to corporate cash hoarding

Jason Zweig wrote Saturday in the WSJ about how companies are hoarding their cash. Microsoft, Cisco, Google, Apple and J & J “added $15 billion in cash and marketable securities to their balance sheets. Microsoft alone packed away roughly $9 billion, or $100 million a day. All told, the companies in the Standard & Poor’s ... The uncorporate solution to corporate cash hoarding