Is Antitrust Too Complicated for Federalist Judges? Forthcoming In Journal of Law and Economics

Josh Wright —  5 January 2010

I’m very pleased to report that my paper with Michael R. Baye (of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University and formerly Director of the Bureau of Economics at the Federal Trade Commission), Is Antitrust Too Complicated For Generalist Judges: The Impact of Economic Complexity and Judicial Training on Appeals, has been accepted for publication by the Journal of Law and Economics.  The paper will appear in the 54th volume scheduled for February 2011.  If you can’t wait until then, here’s the current SSRN version — which will be modified a bit between now and then.  This was a very fun project (discussed here, here, and here) that required a great deal of work from an excellent team of research assistants in compiling the database (thanks again to my RAs!), and elicited a great deal of interest and useful comments from readers and participants at workshops.  I’m very pleased with the placement and looking forward to putting the final touches on the paper.

2 responses to Is Antitrust Too Complicated for Federalist Judges? Forthcoming In Journal of Law and Economics

  1. 

    Josh — I’m relatively certain that the last judges appointed by the Federalists would find antitrust confounding, as they would have been appointed nearly 90 years before the Sherman Act 🙂

  2. 

    Congratulations on a great article and a great placement!