AEA Issues New Disclosure Guidelines for Economists

Josh Wright —  6 January 2012

Here they are:

1) Every submitted article should state the sources of financial support for the particular research it describes. If none, that fact should be stated.

(2) Each author of a submitted article should identify each interested party from whom he or she has received significant financial support, summing to at least $10,000 in the past three years, in the form of consultant fees, retainers, grants and the like. The disclosure requirement also includes in-kind support, such as providing access to data. If the support in question comes with a non-disclosure obligation, that fact should be stated, along with as much information as the obligation permits. If there are no such sources of funds, that fact should be stated explicitly.  An “interested” party is any individual, group, or organization that has a financial, ideological, or political stake related to the article.

(3) Each author should disclose any paid or unpaid positions as officer, director, or board member of relevant non-profit advocacy organizations or profit-making entities. A “relevant” organization is one whose policy positions, goals, or financial interests relate to the article.

(4) The disclosures required above apply to any close relative or partner of any author.

(5) Each author must disclose if another party had the right to review the paper prior to its circulation.

(6) For published articles, information on relevant potential conflicts of interest will be made available to the public.

(7) The AEA urges its members and other economists to apply the above principles in other publications: scholarly journals, op-ed pieces, newspaper and magazine columns, radio and television commentaries, as well as in testimony before federal and state legislative committees and other agencies.

HT: Marginal Revolution.

One response to AEA Issues New Disclosure Guidelines for Economists

  1. 
    Arturo Zendejas 8 January 2012 at 3:36 am

    I applaud AEA for its effort to require its authors to reveal potential conflicts of interest. As in politics, money–whether from the right or left–can buy points of view. Whomever said “We’ve become a country that used to make things to a country that makes things up” was correct. We owe it our children to get our economy in order, by which I mean it must benefit ALL not just a few people.