Archives For announcements

Neil TurkewitzTruth on the Market is delighted to welcome our newest blogger, Neil Turkewitz. Neil is the newly minted Senior Policy Counsel at the International Center for Law & Economics (so we welcome him to ICLE, as well!).

Prior to joining ICLE, Neil spent 30 years at the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), most recently as Executive Vice President, International.

Neil has spent most of his career working to expand economic opportunities for the music industry through modernization of copyright legislation and effective enforcement in global markets. He has worked closely with creative communities around the globe, with the US and foreign governments, and with international organizations (including WIPO and the WTO), to promote legal and enforcement reforms to respond to evolving technology, and to promote a balanced approach to digital trade and Internet governance premised upon the importance of regulatory coherence, elimination of inefficient barriers to global communications, and respect for Internet freedom and the rule of law.

Among other things, Neil was instrumental in the negotiation of the WTO TRIPS Agreement, worked closely with the US and foreign governments in the negotiation of free trade agreements, helped to develop the OECD’s Communique on Principles for Internet Policy Making, coordinated a global effort culminating in the production of the WIPO Internet Treaties, served as a formal advisor to the Secretary of Commerce and the USTR as Vice-Chairman of the Industry Trade Advisory Committee on Intellectual Property Rights, and served as a member of the Board of the Chamber of Commerce’s Global Intellectual Property Center.

You can read some of his thoughts on Internet governance, IP, and international trade here and here.

Welcome Neil!

I’m delighted to announce that David Olson will be guest blogging at Truth on the Market this summer.

olson1David is an Associate Professor at Boston College Law School. He teaches antitrust, patents, and intellectual property law. Professor Olson’s writing has been cited in Supreme Court and other legal opinions. Olson came to Boston College from Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, where he researched in patent law and litigated copyright fair use impact cases. Before entering academia, Professor Olson practiced as a patent litigator. He has published scholarly articles on patent law and antitrust, copyright law, and First Amendment copyright issues. He has been quoted in stories by the Wall Street Journal, Associated Press and Reuters, and has appeared as a guest panelist on WBUR’s Radio Boston, WAMU’s Kojo Namdi Show, and on Public Radio Canada. His scholarly papers are available here.

Perhaps foremost among his many deserved claims to fame, David (along with Hofstra law professor Irina Manta) is the co-author of an excellent paper with musician Aloe Blacc (of Wake Me Up fame).

Welcome David!

The Apple E-Books Antitrust Case: Implications for Antitrust Law and for the Economy — Day 2

February 16, 2016

truthonthemarket.com

We will have a few more posts today to round out the Apple e-books case symposium started yesterday.

You can find all of the current posts, and eventually all of the symposium posts, here. Yesterdays’ posts, in order of posting:

Look for posts a little later today from:

  • Tom Hazlett
  • Morgan Reed
  • Chris Sagers

And possibly a follow-up post or two from some of yesterday’s participants.

The Apple E-Books Antitrust Case: Implications for Antitrust Law and for the Economy

February 15, 2016

truthonthemarket.com

The appellate court’s 2015 decision affirming the district court’s finding of per se liability in United States v. Apple provoked controversy over the legal and economic merits of the case, its significance for antitrust jurisprudence, and its implications for entrepreneurs, startups, and other economic actors throughout the economy. Apple has filed a cert petition with the Supreme Court, which will decide on February 19th whether to hear the case.

On Monday, February 15 and Tuesday February 16, Truth on the Market and the International Center for Law and Economics will present a blog symposium discussing the case and its implications.

We’ve lined up an outstanding and diverse group of scholars, practitioners and other experts to participate in the symposium. The full archive of symposium posts can be found at this link, and individual posts can be accessed by clicking on the author’s name below.

Also see our previous posts at Truth on the Market discussing the Apple e-books case for a preview of many of the issues to be discussed.

shepherd-joannaTruth on the Market is delighted to welcome our newest blogger, Joanna Shepherd. Joanna is a Professor of Law at Emory School of Law and holds an adjunct position in the Emory Economics Department (where she also earned her PhD). At the law school she teaches Torts, Law and Economics, Analytical Methods for Lawyers, and Legal and Economic Issues in Health Policy. She also frequently teaches economics courses to law professors and federal and state judges.

Joanna is also a senior scholar at the International Center for Law and Economics.

Joanna’s research focuses on various law & econ topics. Her recent research has examined issues related to the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries, tort reform, litigation practice, and judicial behavior. Her works has appeared in the Michigan Law Review, Vanderbilt Law Review, Southern California Law Review, New York University Law ReviewDuke Law JournalUCLA Law Review, The Journal of Legal Studies, The Journal of Law & Economics, The American Law & Economics Review, Health Matrix, and The American Journal of Law & Medicine, among others. Joanna is also an author of the textbook, Economic Analysis for Lawyers, with Henry Butler and Christopher Drahozal. Her research has been discussed in numerous newspapers, including the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, and has been cited by several courts including the Supreme Court.

You can find links to Joanna’s scholarship on her SSRN page.

Welcome Joanna!

Profile-Pic-3-professional-200x300Truth On the Market is pleased to announce that Kristian Stout of the International Center for Law and Economics (“ICLE”) has joined our team of writers. Kristian was recently hired by ICLE as Associate Director for Innovation Policy, bringing with him over ten years of experience as a technology professional and entrepreneur. In his role at ICLE, Kristian’s work is focused on the areas of Innovation, Data, Privacy, Telecom, and Intellectual Property.

Kristian has previously been a lecturer in the computer science department of Rutgers University,  is frequently invited to speak on law and technology topics, and has been published in law journals and legal treatises on intellectual property and innovation policy. Kristian is an attorney licensed to practice law in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, is a partner at A&S Technologies, a software services firm, and sits on the board of CodedByKids, a nonprofit organization that provides STEM education to underprivileged children.

Kristian graduated magna cum laude from the Rutgers University School of law, served on the editorial board of the Rutgers Journal of Law and Public Policy, and was awarded a Governor’s Executive Fellowship from the Eagleton Institute of Politics.

He is excited to join the TOTM team, bringing with him a fusion of technological-optimism and a belief in the power of free markets to enhance the welfare of all humanity.

On Wednesday, March 18, our fellow law-and-economics-focused brethren at George Mason’s Law and Economics Center will host a very interesting morning briefing on the intersection of privacy, big data, consumer protection, and antitrust. FTC Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen will keynote and she will be followed by what looks like will be a lively panel discussion. If you are in DC you can join in person, but you can also watch online. More details below.
Please join the LEC in person or online for a morning of lively discussion on this topic. FTC Commissioner Maureen K. Ohlhausen will set the stage by discussing her Antitrust Law Journal article, “Competition, Consumer Protection and The Right [Approach] To Privacy“. A panel discussion on big data and antitrust, which includes some of the leading thinkers on the subject, will follow.
Other featured speakers include:

Allen P. Grunes
Founder, The Konkurrenz Group and Data Competition Institute

Andres Lerner
Executive Vice President, Compass Lexecon

Darren S. Tucker
Partner, Morgan Lewis

Nathan Newman
Director, Economic and Technology Strategies LLC

Moderator: James C. Cooper
Director, Research and Policy, Law & Economics Center

A full agenda is available click here.

During the 2008 presidential campaign, Barack Obama criticized the Bush Administration for “the weakest record of antitrust enforcement of any administration in the last half century” and promised “to reinvigorate antitrust enforcement.” Has the Obama Administration’s antitrust enforcement record over the last six years lived up to this extravagant promise? More specifically, what grade should be assigned to Obama Administration antitrust policy overall?

The Heritage Foundation will explore these questions in a January 29, 2015 conference entitled “Obama Administration Antitrust Policy: A Report Card.” The conference will start with a bang, with keynote remarks by former FTC Chairman, Professor Bill Kovacic – perhaps the most dynamic antitrust orator of our time.   The conference will then feature a free-flowing discussion among antitrust experts, with separate panels discussing the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Justice Department’s Antitrust Division, and international antitrust. Speakers will include top notch practitioners and scholars who have led the FTC and the Antitrust Division – and one distinguished federal jurist, D.C. Circuit Judge and George Mason Law Professor Douglas Ginsburg, who has been a leading academic, Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust, and OMB Administrator for Information and Regulatory Affairs. Former Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust James Rill, who was the leader in promoting international antitrust convergence, will also speak.

Best of all, the conference (including lunch) is free – all you need to do is register for it at the Heritage Foundation’s website. You won’t want to miss it.

The Federal Trade Commission’s recent enforcement actions against Amazon and Apple raise important questions about the FTC’s consumer protection practices, especially its use of economics. How does the Commission weigh the costs and benefits of its enforcement decisions? How does the agency employ economic analysis in digital consumer protection cases generally?

Join the International Center for Law and Economics and TechFreedom on Thursday, July 31 at the Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company for a lunch and panel discussion on these important issues, featuring FTC Commissioner Joshua Wright, Director of the FTC’s Bureau of Economics Martin Gaynor, and several former FTC officials. RSVP here.

Commissioner Wright will present a keynote address discussing his dissent in Apple and his approach to applying economics in consumer protection cases generally.

Geoffrey Manne, Executive Director of ICLE, will briefly discuss his recent paper on the role of economics in the FTC’s consumer protection enforcement. Berin Szoka, TechFreedom President, will moderate a panel discussion featuring:

  • Martin Gaynor, Director, FTC Bureau of Economics
  • David Balto, Fmr. Deputy Assistant Director for Policy & Coordination, FTC Bureau of Competition
  • Howard Beales, Fmr. Director, FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection
  • James Cooper, Fmr. Acting Director & Fmr. Deputy Director, FTC Office of Policy Planning
  • Pauline Ippolito, Fmr. Acting Director & Fmr. Deputy Director, FTC Bureau of Economics

Background

The FTC recently issued a complaint and consent order against Apple, alleging its in-app purchasing design doesn’t meet the Commission’s standards of fairness. The action and resulting settlement drew a forceful dissent from Commissioner Wright, and sparked a discussion among the Commissioners about balancing economic harms and benefits in Section 5 unfairness jurisprudence. More recently, the FTC brought a similar action against Amazon, which is now pending in federal district court because Amazon refused to settle.

Event Info

The “FTC: Technology and Reform” project brings together a unique collection of experts on the law, economics, and technology of competition and consumer protection to consider challenges facing the FTC in general, and especially regarding its regulation of technology. The Project’s initial report, released in December 2013, identified critical questions facing the agency, Congress, and the courts about the FTC’s future, and proposed a framework for addressing them.

The event will be live streamed here beginning at 12:15pm. Join the conversation on Twitter with the #FTCReform hashtag.

When:

Thursday, July 31
11:45 am – 12:15 pm — Lunch and registration
12:15 pm – 2:00 pm — Keynote address, paper presentation & panel discussion

Where:

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company – Rehearsal Hall
641 D St NW
Washington, DC 20004

Questions? – Email mail@techfreedom.orgRSVP here.

See ICLE’s and TechFreedom’s other work on FTC reform, including:

  • Geoffrey Manne’s Congressional testimony on the the FTC@100
  • Op-ed by Berin Szoka and Geoffrey Manne, “The Second Century of the Federal Trade Commission”
  • Two posts by Geoffrey Manne on the FTC’s Amazon Complaint, here and here.

About The International Center for Law and Economics:

The International Center for Law and Economics is a non-profit, non-partisan research center aimed at fostering rigorous policy analysis and evidence-based regulation.

About TechFreedom:

TechFreedom is a non-profit, non-partisan technology policy think tank. We work to chart a path forward for policymakers towards a bright future where technology enhances freedom, and freedom enhances technology.

We’re delighted to announce the newest addition to our blogging roster, Alden Abbott.

Alden recently joined the Heritage Foundation as Senior Fellow and Deputy Director of the Center for Legal and Judicial Studies. For two years ending in April 2014, he was Director, Global Patent Law and Competition Strategy at Blackberry.

Alden has been at the center of the US antitrust universe for most of his career. When he retired from the FTC in 2012, he had served as Deputy Director of the Office of International Affairs for three years. Before that he was Director of Policy and Coordination, FTC Bureau of Competition; Acting General Counsel, Department of Commerce; Chief Counsel, National Telecommunications and Information Administration; Senior Counsel, Office of Legal Counsel, DOJ; and Special Assistant to the Assistant Attorney General for Antitrust, DOJ.

Alden is also an Adjunct Professor at George Mason Law School, a member of the Leadership of the American Bar Association’s Antitrust Section, and a Non-Governmental Advisor to the International Competition Network.

We look forward to Alden’s posts here at TOTM, the first of which will follow shortly.