Archives For announcements

I will be speaking at a lunch debate in DC hosted by TechFreedom on Friday, September 28, 2012, to discuss the FTC’s antitrust investigation of Google. Details below.

TechFreedom will host a livestreamed, parliamentary-style lunch debate on Friday September 28, 2012, to discuss the FTC’s antitrust investigation of Google.   As the company has evolved, expanding outward from its core search engine product, it has come into competition with a range of other firms and established business models. This has, in turn, caused antitrust regulators to investigate Google’s conduct, essentially questioning whether the company’s success obligates it to treat competitors neutrally. James Cooper, Director of Research and Policy for the Law and Economics Center at George Mason University School of Law, will moderate a panel of four distinguished commenters to discuss the question, “Should the FTC Sue Google Over Search?”  

Arguing “Yes” will be:

Arguing “No” will be:

When:
Friday, September 28, 2012
12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Where:
The Monocle Restaurant
107 D Street Northeast
Washington, DC 20002

RSVP here. The event will be livestreamed here and you can follow the conversation on Twitter at #GoogleFTC.

For those viewing by livestream, we will watch for questions posted to Twitter at the #GoogleFTC hashtag and endeavor, as possible, to incorporate them into the debate.

Questions?
Email contact@techfreedom.org

Truth on the Market and the International Center for Law & Economics are delighted (if a bit saddened) to announce that President Obama intends to nominate Joshua Wright, Research Director and Member of the Board of Directors of ICLE and Professor of Law at George Mason University School of Law, to be the next Commissioner at the Federal Trade Commission.

Josh is widely regarded as the top antitrust scholar of his generation.  He is the author of more than 50 scholarly articles and book chapters, including several that were released as ICLE White Papers.  He is a co-author of the most widely-used antitrust casebook, and co-editor of three books on topics ranging from Competition Policy and Intellectual Property Law to the Intellectual History of Law and Economics.  And, of course, he is Truth on the Market’s most prolific blogger — a platform that has likely projected his influence more than any other.

Josh holds economics and law degrees from UCLA, and he is one of only a small handful of young antitrust scholars in the legal academy to hold both a PhD in economics as well as a JD.  If confirmed, he will also be only the fourth economist to serve as FTC Commissioner (following Jim Miller, George Douglas and Dennis Yao) and the first JD/PhD.

Josh’s scholarship and approach to antitrust are firmly grounded in the UCLA economics tradition, exemplified by the members of Josh’s dissertation committee — Armen Alchian, Harold Demsetz & Benjamin Klein.

For my part, I couldn’t be happier with Josh’s nomination.  Josh’s “error cost” approach to antitrust and consumer protection law will be a tremendous asset to the Commission.  His work is rigorous, empirically grounded, and ever-mindful of the complexities of the institutional settings in which businesses act and in which regulators enforce.  I am honored to have co-authored several articles with Josh, and, like many of the readers of this blog, I have learned an incredible amount about antitrust law and economics from my interactions with him.  The Commissioners and staff at the FTC will surely similarly profit from his time there.

We are delighted to report that the ABA Business Law Section has posthumously awarded Larry Ribstein its Martin I. Lubaroff Award, presented annually to a lawyer who has consistently demonstrated leadership, scholarship, and outstanding service in LLCs, Partnerships and Unincorporated Entities law.  That describes no one so well as Larry.

The award was established in 2001 to honor the memory of Marty Lubaroff who untimely passed away on January 1, 2001. Marty was the quintessential lawyer–careful, thorough, exacting, engaging, insightful, precise, provocative and persistent, while gentle, kind and courteous. He was a good friend and mentor to scores of lawyers in Delaware and throughout the United States. Marty was a long-time member of, and key participant in, the LLCs, Partnerships and Unincorporated Entities Committee. He chaired the Limited Partnerships Subcommittee at the time of his death.

Larry’s influence continues to be felt and acknowledged.  In addition to the GMU Law & Economics Center conference Josh mentioned, the Illinois College of Law is honoring Larry with a conference and memorial fund of its own:

In recognition and celebration of Professor Ribstein’s innumerous contributions to legal scholarship and the academy, the College of Law will host a conference in October 2013, the proceedings of which will be published in a special edition of theUniversity of Illinois Law Review. And in honor of Professor Ribstein’s incredible influence on students, colleagues, and the legal profession, the College has established The Larry E. Ribstein Memorial Fund. The Fund will be used to support a series of initiatives to advance the intellectual life of the University of Illinois College of Law, including a signature lecture series, workshops for junior faculty members, and innovations designed to more effectively bridge the worlds of legal theory and legal practice.

I’m very pleased to announce the George Mason Law & Economics Center is hosting a program focusing on our friend and colleague Larry Ribstein’s scholarship on the market for law.   Henry Butler and Bruce Kobayashi have put together a really wonderful program of folks coming together not to celebrate Larry’s work — but to use it as a platform for further discussion and for legal scholars to engage in these important issues.

Interested readers might want to check out the TOTM Unlocking the Law Symposium.

The announcement follows and I hope to see some of you there on Friday, November 9, 2012 at GMU Law.
The Henry G. Manne Program in Law and Regulatory Studies presents Unlocking the Law: Building on the Work of Professor Larry Ribstein to be held at George Mason University School of Law, Friday, November 9th, 2012. The conference will run from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

OVERVIEW: In a series of influential and provocative articles, Professor Larry Ribstein examined the forces behind the recent upheaval in the market for legal services. These forces included increased global competition, changes in the demand for legal services resulting from the expanded role of the in-house counsel, and the expanded use of technology. His analysis showed that changes in the market for legal services were not just the result of a cyclical downturn in the economy. Rather, the profound changes in the market reflected building competitive pressures that exposed the flaws in the business model used by large firms to provide legal services. His recent writings also examined the broader implications of this upheaval for legal education, the private production of law, and whether legal innovation will be hindered by or hasten the demise of the current system of professional regulation of lawyers.

Professor Ribstein passed away suddenly on December 24, 2011. In the wake of the terrible loss of their close friend and colleague, Professors Henry Butler and Bruce Kobayashi (along with several other colleagues at Mason Law) have decided to honor Larry through a conference designed to capture and expand on the spirit of Larry’s recent work. The Unlocking the Law Conference seeks to advance these goals by inviting legal scholars to present their views and engage in a vibrant discussion about the present and future of the market for legal services. The panels at this conference will showcase 14 papers written specifically for this occasion and presented to the public for the first time.

This conference is organized by Henry N. Butler, Executive Director of the Law & Economics Center and George Mason Foundation Professor of Law, and Bruce H. Kobayashi, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law through a new Project on Legal Services Reform – under the auspices of the Mason Law & Economics Center. The Project on Legal Services Reform seeks to continue and extend the important work on legal innovation, legal education, law firms, and legal regulation produced by Larry. We hope to encourage scholars who have not worked in these areas to read Larry’s work, critique it in the same manner in which Larry famously commented on papers, and expand (or even restrict or redirect) the thrust of Larry’s work. In essence, this project is about “Larry as Catalyst.”

For background information, you might want to visit TRUTH ON THE MARKET (http://www.truthonthemarket.com), which held an online symposium on this topic on September 19 and 20, 2011.

REGISTRATION: You must pre-register for this event. To register, please send a message with your name, affiliation, and full contact information to: Jeff Smith, Coordinator, Henry G. Manne Program in Law and Regulatory Studies, jsmithQ@gmu.edu

AGENDA:

Friday, November 9, 2012:

Panel I. The Future of Legal Services and Legal Education

How the Structure of Universities Determined the Fate of American Law Schools
– Henry G. Manne, Distinguished Visiting Professor, Ave Maria School of Law; Dean Emeritus, George Mason University School of Law

The Undergraduate Option for Legal Education
– John O. McGinnis, George C. Dix Professor in Constitutional Law, Northwestern University School of Law

Panel II. Deregulating Legal Services

The Deprofessionalization of Profession Services: What Law and Medicine Have in Common and How They Differ
– Richard A. Epstein, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law, New York University School of Law

The Future of Licensing Lawyers
– M. Todd Henderson, Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School

Failing the Legal System: Why Lawyers and Judges Need to Act to Authorize the Organizational Practice of Law
– Gillian K. Hadfield, Richard L. and Antoinette Schamoi Kirtland Professor of Law and Professor of Economics, University of Southern California Gould School of Law

Globalization and Deregulation of Legal Services
– Nuno Garoupa, Professor and H. Ross and Helen Workman Research Scholar, University of Illinois College of Law; Co-Director, Illinois Program on Law, Behavior, and Social Science

Panel III. Law Firms and Competition Between Lawyers

From Big Law to Lean Law
– William D. Henderson, Professor of Law and Van Nolan Faculty Fellow, Indiana University Maurer School of Law; Director, Center on the Global Legal Profession

Glass Half Full: The Significant Upsides to the Changes in the American Legal Market
– Benjamin H. Barton, Professor of Law, University of Tennessee College of Law

An Exploration of Price Competition Among Lawyers
– Clifford Winston, Senior Fellow, Economics Studies, Brooking Institution

Panel IV. Reputation, Fiduciary Duties, and Agency Costs

Lawyers as Reputational Intermediaries: Sovereign Bond Issuances (1820-2012)
– Michael H. Bradley, F.M. Kirby Professor of Investment Banking Emeritus, Fuqua School of Business, Duke University; Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law
– Mitu Gulati, Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law
– Irving A. De Lira Salvatierra, Graduate Student, Department of Economics, Duke University

The Fiduciary Society
– Jason Scott Johnston, Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law and Nicholas E. Chimicles Research Professor in Business Law and Regulation, University of Virginia School of Law

Class Action Lawmakers and the Agency Problem
– Barry E. Adler, Bernard Petrie Professor of Law and Business and Associate Dean for Information Systems and Technology, New York University School of Law

Panel V. Private Lawmaking and Adjudication

Decentralizing the Lawmaking Function: Should There Be Intellectual Property Rights in Law?
– Robert G. Bone, G. Rollie White Teaching Excellence Chair in Law, University of Texas at Austin School of Law

Arbitration, the Law Market, and the Law of Lawyering
– Erin O’Hara O’Connor, Milton R. Underwood Chair in Law, Vanderbilt University Law School
– Peter B. Rutledge, Herman E. Talmadge Chair of Law, University of Georgia Law School

VENUE:
George Mason University School of Law
3301 Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22201

FURTHER INFORMATION: For more information regarding this conference or other initiatives of the Law & Economics Center, please visit: http://www.MasonLEC.org

Call or send an email to: Tel: (703) 993-8040, Email: lec@gmu.edu

The Henry G. Manne Program in Law & Economics honors the legacy of Henry G. Manne, Dean Emeritus of George Mason Law School and founder of the Law & Economics Center. Manne was a trailblazer in the development of law and economics, not only as a prominent and influential scholar, but also as an academic entrepreneur. He spurred the development of law and economics into the most influential area of legal scholarship through his Economics Institutes for Law Professors and Law Institutes for Economics Professors. The Manne Program promotes law-and-economics scholarship by funding faculty research and hosting research roundtables and academic conferences.

http://www.MasonManne.org

Congratulations to my friend, colleague, and occasional TOTM contributor Steve Salop (Georgetown Law) on winning Global Competition Review’s Academic Excellence Award this year.  From the announcement:

Around 1,500 Global Competition Review (GCR) readers cast their votes, honoring outstanding individuals in such areas as competition law and economics around the world. GCR is the world’s leading antitrust and competition law journal and news service. The Academic Excellence Award recognizes a highly regarded academic and was presented to Professor Salop at GCR’s 2nd Annual Charity Awards Dinner in Washington, DC. In addition to being a senior consultant to CRA, Dr. Salop is a professor of economics and law at the Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, DC, where he teaches antitrust law and economics and economic reasoning for lawyers.

Congratulations Steve.

A colleague sent along the 2011 Washington & Lee law journal rankings.  As co-editor of the Supreme Court Economic Review (along with Todd Zywicki and Ilya Somin) I was very pleased to notice how well the SCER is faring by these measures.  While these rankings should always be taken with a grain of salt or two, by “Impact Factor” here are the top 3 law journals in the “economics” sub-specialty:

  1. Supreme Court Economic Review (1.46)
  2. Journal of Legal Studies (1.31)
  3. Journal of Empirical Legal Studies (1.2)

SCER comes in third in the “Combined” rankings behind Journal of Empirical Legal Studies and the Journal of Legal Studies.

SCER is a peer-reviewed journal and operates on an exclusive submission basis.  You can take a look at our most recent volume here.  If you have an interesting law & economics piece (hint: it need not be related to a Supreme Court case) you’d like to submit, please consider us.

Submissions can be emailed to: scer@gmu.edu

UPDATE: I should also note that George Mason’s Journal of Law, Economics and Policy also ranks very well by these measures!  It is a student-run journal here at GMU Law and comes in 13th and 16th in the “economics” category by impact factor and combined ranking, respectively.

Speaking of JLEP ….

JLEP will be hosting a great symposium in conjunction with GMU’s Information Economy Project (directed by Tom Hazlett) on Friday: The Digital Inventor: How Entrepreneurs Compete on Platforms.   I have the privilege of moderating one of the panels.  But the lineup of speakers is just terrific.

  • Richard Langlois, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics 
  • Thomas Hazlett, Prof. of Law & Economics, George Mason University
  • Andrei Hagiu, Harvard Business School, Multi-Sided Platforms
  • Salil Mehra, Temple University Beasley School of Law, Platforms and the Choice of Models
  • Donald Rosenberg, Qualcomm, Inc.
  • Anne Layne-Farrar, Compass-Lexecon, The Brothers Grimm Book of Business Models: A Survey of Literature and Developments in Patent Acquisition and Litigation
  • James Bessen, Boston University School of Law, The Private Costs of Patent Litigation
  • David Teece, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley

There will be a memorial reception for Larry on Wednesday, January 4, at 4:00 PM at George Mason University School of Law, 3301 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22201.

If you plan to attend, please first email Henry Butler at hnbutler-at-gmu-dot-edu.

Larry Ribstein, RIP

Geoffrey Manne —  24 December 2011

This morning our dear colleague, Larry Ribstein, passed away.  The intellectual life of everyone who knew him, of this blog, and of the legal academy at large is deeply diminished for his passing.

For me, as for many others, Larry was an important influence, not only intellectually but personally, as well.  Larry was the godfather of this blog, which got its start when a few of us, including Bill Sjostrom, Josh, Thom and me, pinch hit for Larry at Ideoblog in November 2005.  It took eight of us, including my dad, to fill his shoes, and still his traffic went down.  More than anyone else, Larry was instrumental in my decision to leave law teaching to work at Microsoft.  Completely unsure what to do and worried about how it would affect my ability to return to law teaching, I called Larry, who had no doubt.  He sealed the deal by pointing out that a move like that one would open some completely unanticipated, and potentially great, career paths and telling me not to worry so much about getting back to law teaching.  He was right, of course, and, thus also an important influence on the creation of the International Center for Law and Economics.  And Larry was a friend, one of those I always looked forward to seeing at ALEA and other conferences, more than once providing the necessary marginal incentive to attend.

We grieve for Ann, Sarah and Susannah and mourn his passing.

UPDATE:

The outpouring in the blogosphere from Larry’s friends, admirers, colleagues, and the like is, not surprisingly, moving.  As we find them and receive them from friends who ask us to post them here, we will continue to collect remembrances here.

Don Boudreaux

I didn’t know Larry very well, but on those four or five occasions when we were together at seminars I unfailingly learned from – and enjoyed – his contributions.  He was a scholar who wasted no words; every one – verbally from his mouth, and written from his keyboard – moved the discussion forward.

Saul Levmore

Larry’s passing is a sad and grave loss. I liked his independence of mind.

Daniel Martin Katz

This is a sad day for the American Legal Academy

Pejman Yousefzadeh

Professor Ribstein was a decent, kind man, who was also a brilliant scholar with penetrating insights. Academia in general–and legal scholarship in particular–will be poorer for his absence.

Francis Pileggi

Although I only “knew him through blogging” and via emails and cross-linking on each of our blogs, I feel a great loss and a void by his absence.

Cynthia Williams

It is hard to imagine the University of Illinois College of Law without Larry.

Champaign News-Gazette (with quotes from Andy Morriss, Nuno Garoupa, Henry Butler and Bruce Smith)

Friends and colleagues of Larry Ribstein say they’ll remember him as a first-rate legal scholar and original thinker who enjoyed debate and was an expert in business law.  They also recall him as a generous person who was a gifted photographer and an authority on movies and the law.

Washington Legal Foundation

Larry’s work, educational innovations, and always original scholarship were an inspiration to us at WLF, and we will miss him.

Federalist Society

A friend of the Federalist Society’s, Professor Ribstein was a man of great courage, intellect, and wisdom.

Alan Palmiter

We owe it to ourselves and especially to our students that Larry stay with us.

Tom Ginsburg

Larry was great colleague and friend, whose passion for ideas was simply unrivaled. we will miss him greatly.

Mark Peecher

Though invariably busy, Larry seemed to always say yes to big asks that involved substantial travel and time in order to speak with others on topical, important issues — a consummate academic citizen and scholar. Like so many of you, I shall greatly miss Larry Ribstein.

Walter Olson

Legal academia is in mourning for one of its most distinguished and multitalented figures, Larry Ribstein, a key scholar in corporate law and a provocative and rigorous exponent of law and economics thinking. Larry was an early blogger (at Ideoblog and more recently Truth on the Market), an influential critic of prosecutorial and regulatory excess, and a key voice in the debate on what law schools should do. He was also, I am grateful to say, an important friend of this site over many years.

Gordon Smith

As I have reflected about Larry’s passing over the past day, I realize that he was my friend because we shared a love of ideas, and he was my mentor because he taught me the importance of getting those ideas right

Dave Hoffman

Larry Ribstein, who died earlier this week, was a galvanic force as a scholar and blogger.  I join those who’ve expressed sadness and loss at his untimely passing.

Ellen Podgor

He was an extraordinary scholar and a welcomed and strong member of the academic blogosphere

Peter Mahler

I am grateful that in this fashion I got to know Professor Larry Ribstein, who passed away unexpectedly last weekend at the peak of his prolific, dazzling career as a leading academic voice and mentor to many in diverse fields of business law and particularly in the area of unincorporated business entities.

Henry Manne

On a personal note, I have lost a delightful and valued friend, a professional and intellectual “son” who was not supposed to predecease his mentor, and my intellectual biographer . . . who taught me that I had said far more than I ever understood.  I join the others who loved Larry in sending our deepest sympathy and condolences to Ann, Sarah and Susanna.

Andy Morriss

Larry wouldn’t accept less than the best from anyone, including himself. We’re all the poorer for his untimely death; we’re all the richer for his body of work and his influence on so many. His kindness and generosity knew no bounds.  I suspect he’s already been named Associate Archangel for Research in heaven and doubled scholarly output there.

Keith Sharfman

Like everyone else, I am shaken by Larry’s untimely passing. He was a fine scholar and a truly nice person. His *generosity* is what I remember most about him, especially as relates to younger scholars.

Tom Kirkendall

Beyond his special intelligence and intellectual honesty, though, the trait that drew me most to Larry was his humanity. Although he decried how our government’s senseless criminalization of business was destroying jobs and hindering the creation of wealth, Larry cared even more deeply about the incalculable damage to executives and their families that resulted from the absurdly-long prison terms that were often the product of such dubious prosecutions. When family members of wrongfully prosecuted executives came upon Larry’s writings, many of them would reach out to Larry for support, which he generously provided to them. And I will never forget Larry’s touching note to me after he read a blog post that I wrote on the death of Bill Olis, Jamie Olis’ father.  Larry Ribstein – husband, father, lawyer, teacher, colleague, writer, counselor, friend.  A fine legacy, indeed.

Bill Sjostrom

Larry was a brilliant, prolific, and provocative scholar who will be sorely missed.

Paul Rubin

This news is devastating.  I had recently discussed his work on movies, and tried to induce him to edit a special issue for Managerial and Decision Economics.  Aside from his remarkable publishing record, his paper “Wall Street and Vine: Hollywood’s View of Business” shows that Larry had seen and remembered more movies than anyone I know.  A true tragedy.

Thom Lambert

Although I didn’t know him as well as some of my co-bloggers did, Larry very much influenced my own development as an academic. He provided excellent feedback on my own work, gave me my start as a law blogger (writing as a guest at Ideoblog), reinvigorated Truth on the Market, and continually educated, challenged, inspired, and entertained me with his prolific blogging.

J.W. Verret

When I think of what it means to be a legal scholar, in my head I will always have a picture of Larry Ribstein.

Josh Wright

The legal academy will be worse off for losing Larry’s voice as a scholar.  Larry will be greatly missed here at Truth on the Market, and as a friend.

Todd Henderson

I will miss him beyond words. I will consider it a life well lived if when I die there is at least one person left behind who feels as I do about Larry.

Larry Solum

I have fond memories of many long discussions with Ribstein.  He defended his vision of law with a tenacity and rigor that is rare, even among law professors.  Just a few days ago, Larry and I had planned to get together at the AALS meeting in Washington.  I will miss him!

Stephen Bainbridge

The first time I met Larry, I thought he would make a brilliant Mephistopheles. He was lean in body with sharp and angular facial features, ever so slightly swarthy, and somehow just a little scary. As I got to know him over many years, of course, I learned that he was a brilliant scholar with a wide array of interests, an incisive mind, a vast store of learning, and a talent for getting to the heart of the matter, but also that he was a great person and someone whose company was always a treat.

Ted Frank

But beyond the loss to legal scholarship is the loss of a good person. Larry was also a friend, but an intellectually honest one who wouldn’t hesitate to tell you when he thought you were wrong (which happened several times a year to me). But that made it all the more flattering when he demonstrated support, and he was an early supporter of mine when it was far from clear that my hare-brained quixotic scheme would accomplish anything. I’m going to miss him a lot. Condolences to his family and friends.

Kim Krawiec

Following up on Dan’s post, via Larry Solum comes the horrible, horrible news that Larry Ribstein passed away this morning.  This has shocked and devastated our household and much of the legal academy.  I’ve known Larry for many, many years.  He was a supportive senior colleague at the beginning of my career (and remained one until the end).  He was a prolific and interesting scholar with wide-ranging interests, from “uncorporations” to polygamy. He was also a good friend.  He’ll be missed by many.

Ilya Somin

No doubt there will be many analyses and appreciations of Larry’s outstanding contributions to scholarship over the coming days and weeks. My personal favorite among his many excellent works is his recent book The Law Market (coauthored with Erin O’Hara), which is perhaps the best recent book on the potential benefits of competition between state legal systems in American federalism. Larry is also well-known in the legal blogosphere for his insightful posts at Truth on the Market, where he wrote an excellent post on ABA accreditation of law schools just a few days ago.

Jeff Lipshaw

More than anything, he was alive with ideas and personality and pungent observations, whether or not you liked or agreed with them (and sometimes I didn’t).  I was proud of his praise and thanks when we finished our projects and proud that he was willing to have me as a writing partner.

Matt Bodie

I’m shocked, horrified, and saddened to hear of Larry Ribstein’s passing.  There will be time to consider his wide-ranging, innovative, and incisive scholarship in the days, months, and years to come.  For now, I offer my sympathy to his family and colleagues at Illinois.  A very sad day for legal and corporate law academia.

Nancy Rapoport

Not only was he exceptionally smart and creative, but he seemed like a very nice person.  I’ll miss reading his work, and my heart goes out to his friends and family.

Jonathan Adler

I was terribly saddened to learn that Professor Larry Ribstein suffered a stroke and died yesterday.  He was on the faculty when I studied at George Mason, though I never had the good fortune to have him as one of my professors.  I have, however, learned quite a bit from his scholarly and other writings, as well as from our occasional conversations.  He will be missed.

Erik Gerding

The label of “ideological” is often used pejoratively and casually to dismiss arguments.  But Larry was ideological in a truer sense.  He was committed to rigorously and systematically working out ideas, ideals, and their consequences.  Larry’s contribution to the academy far exceeded even his large body of scholarship.  I miss him.

C.E. Petit

Our politics did not match well, but our shared interest in the interface between individuals and their business interests led to some interesting exchanges over the years… and helped sharpen my thoughts on how authors and other creators of intellectual property should arrange their own business affairs.

Bruce Smith (Dean, University of Illinois College of Law)

Larry was a scholar of incandescent intellect, breathtaking range, and unflagging energy,” said Dean Bruce Smith. “He cared passionately about his students and about transforming legal education to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century. He invested selflessly in the professional development of junior faculty members – whether at Illinois or at other institutions. He cared deeply about the College of Law and contributed incalculably to it through his ideas, his engagement, and his counsel. And he cherished his family with a love that was boundless. Larry was a towering figure and an incomparable person, and he will be dearly missed.

Stefan Padfield

Thus, while there is obviously much in terms of scholarship that Larry is worth remembering for, what I will primarily remember him for is his inspiring kindness.

Donald Clarke

So broad is Larry’s impact that it even reaches the field of Chinese law. He had been to China and was consulted on the drafting of (what else?) China’s Partnership Law.  It is truly sad that such a terrific scholar and colleague has been lost to us.

Renee Newman Knake

I met Larry just over a year ago while giving a talk at Illinois, and found him to be incredibly generous to me as a junior scholar, both in encouraging my work and offering an opportunity to participate in the recent Truth on the Market symposium Unlocking the Law: Deregulating the Legal Profession.

Editors of the ABA Journal recently selected Truth on the Market as one of the top 100 law blogs. Blogs dedicated to law have proliferated in the last few years and of the 3,500 entries in their directory, the ABA Journal placed Truth on the Market among the top six dedicated to business law.

Congratulations are in order for all of those involved. Eric Helland, Thom Lambert, Larry Ribstein, Paul Rubin, Mike Sykuta, J.W. Verret, and Josh Wright are among the most insightful law & economics thinkers I know. Meanwhile, our excellent commenters turn the posts into great conversations and often provide thought-provoking points.  Some of our regular, pseudonymous commenters, in particular (you know who you are–and so do we!), have engendered some of our best–and most interesting–disputes.

Explaining the nomination, the Journal captured both the spirit and the mission of TOTM:

This blog’s academic commentary on economics, antitrust law and corporate governance is never stuffy. These profs make astute observations and find concrete examples to make their points—and very often, they think the point is that there should be less government regulation all around.

But we’re not done yet.  Until December 30, polls are open over at the ABA Journal to vote for your favorite blog in each of the categories.  We urge all of our readers to go to http://www.abajournal.com/blawg100 to register and to vote for Truth on the Market in the Business Law category. At the moment we’re neck and neck with our friend Prof. Bainbridge for the top slot.  It may be close, but the 8 of us should be able to best the 1 of him!

Thanks again to all our readers, commenters and to my fellow bloggers.

We’re delighted to be joined for the next couple of weeks by guest blogger, Hal Singer.

Hal is Managing Director and Principal at Navigant Economics. He has written, thought and advised extensively on antitrust, finance and general regulatory issues.  His SSRN page is here, and it includes co-authors like David Teece, Dan Rubinfeld, Jerry Hausman, Greg Sidak, Bob Crandall, and Bob Litan, among many others. He is the co-author of the book Broadband in Europe: How Brussels Can Wire the Information Society (Kluwer/Springer Press 2005). and his article have appeared in, among there, American Economics Association Papers and Proceedings, Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, Journal of Industrial Economics, Journal of Network Industries, Journal of Regulatory Economics, Review of Network Economics, Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy, and Yale Journal on Regulation. He has also served as Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business.

On the policy front, his essays have appeared in several leading newspapers and magazines, including Antitrust, Forbes, The Economist’s Voice, Harvard Business Review, Health Affairs, The Milken Institute Review, Regulation, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. His M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics are from the Johns Hopkins University and his B.S. magna cum laude in economics is from Tulane University.

Perhaps of particular interest to our readers, one of Hal’s most recent articles (with Gerald Faulhaber) is on wireless broadband competition and the FCC’s most recent wireless competition report, a not-uncommon subject around here (see, e.g., here).  It’s an excellent paper, and you can find a link to the article and a podcast of Hal discussing the paper with Jerry Brito here.

We look forward to a stimulating set of posts from Hal — and he isn’t shy, so don’t hesitate to weigh in in the comments!