Zeke Emanuel on the ACA’s Adverse Selection Problem and Solutions to It

Thom Lambert —  7 May 2013

Ezekiel Emanuel, Rahm’s brother and former health care adviser to President Obama, acknowledges in today’s Wall Street Journal that adverse selection may prove to be a “bump in the road” in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).  But never you mind.  He’s got solutions.  And, as usual, they all come down to messaging.

Emanuel describes the ACA’s adverse selection problem in what are, for this Administration and its surrogates, remarkably frank terms:

Here is the specific problem: Insurance companies worry that young people, especially young men, already think they are invincible, and they are bewildered about the health-care reform in general and exchanges in particular. They may tune out, forego purchasing health insurance and opt to pay a penalty instead when their taxes come due.

The consequence would be a disproportionate number of older and sicker people purchasing insurance, which will raise insurance premiums and, in turn, discourage more people from enrolling. This reluctance to enroll would damage a key aspect of reform.

Insurance companies are spooked by this possibility, so they are already raising premiums to protect themselves from potential losses. Yet this step can help create the very problem that they are trying to avoid. If premiums are high—or even just perceived to be high—young people will be more likely to avoid buying insurance, which could start the negative, downward spiral of exchanges full of the sick and elderly with not enough healthy people paying premiums.

Of course, Emanuel leaves out an important part of the story: the fact that the ACA itself encourages young, healthy people (the “young invincibles,” he calls them) to forego buying health insurance.  The statute does so by mandating that health insurance be sold on a “guaranteed issue” basis (meaning that insurance companies can’t deny coverage to people who waited to buy it until they became sick) and at prices based on “community rating” (meaning that those who are sick or susceptible to sickness can’t be charged more than the healthy).  Taken together, these provisions largely eliminate the adverse personal consequences of waiting to buy health insurance until you need medical treatment.  (You can’t be denied coverage or charged a higher premium reflecting your illness.)  They thereby decimate the incentive for young, healthy people to buy health insurance until they need it.  And since the law doesn’t (and can’t, according to the Supreme Court) require young, healthy people to carry insurance, many are likely to forego buying coverage in favor of paying a small “tax” — $95 in 2014, as opposed to the $2,480 out-of-pocket cost for an individual policy bought on a subsidized exchange by a 26 year-old earning $30,000.  As I have argued on this blog and elsewhere, the ACA is likely to generate a devastating spiral of adverse selection as the “young invincibles” drop out of the pool of insureds, causing premiums for the covered population to rise, encouraging even more of the marginally healthy to exit the risk pool, causing premiums to rise even further, etc., etc.

But don’t you worry.  Dr. Emanuel’s got it figured out.  He explains:

Fortunately, there are solutions [to this ACA-induced adverse selection problem]. First, young people believe in President Obama. They overwhelmingly voted for him. He won by a 23% margin among voters 18-29—just the people who need to enroll. The president connects with young people, too, so he needs to use that bond and get out there to convince them to sign up for health insurance to help this central part of his legacy. Every commencement address by an administration official should encourage young graduates to get health insurance.

Second, we need to make clear as a society that buying insurance is part of individual responsibility. If you don’t have insurance and you need to go to the emergency room or unexpectedly get diagnosed with cancer, you are free- riding on others. Insured Americans will have to pay more to hospitals and doctors to make up for your nonpayment. The social norm of individual responsibility must be equated with purchasing health insurance.

Finally, and most important, we should adopt some of Massachusetts’ practices. When state officials in 2006-2007 were rolling out their exchange—called the Massachusetts Connector—they mounted a sustained campaign to encourage enrollment by young people. One aspect of the campaign focused in particular on young men, even heavily promoting the new exchange on TV during Red Sox games and hosting an annual “Health Connector Day” at Fenway Park.

So we’re going to lick this pernicious adverse selection problem by combining President Obama’s legendary star power with a dollop of good old fashioned shaming and some targeted advertising during baseball games?  One is reminded of Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge’s 2003 statement that Americans should use duct tape to protect themselves from chemical weapons attacks.  But this is really worse.  The chance of a chemical weapons attack in 2003 was pretty small.  Insurance premiums’ rising as a result of ACA-inspired adverse selection, by contrast, is a near certainty. Let’s make sure we keep the President and HHS Secretary Sebelius on that commencement address circuit!

Thom Lambert

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I am a law professor at the University of Missouri Law School. I teach antitrust law, business organizations, and contracts. My scholarship focuses on regulatory theory, with a particular emphasis on antitrust.

3 responses to Zeke Emanuel on the ACA’s Adverse Selection Problem and Solutions to It

  1. 

    The comments by Emmanuel are pathetic, even cruel. He is begging for young people to spend $1,000-$2,000 which they may not have, all to bail out Obama?

    I have worked inside an insurance company. Few people realize that it takes about 50 healthy people in a plan to smooth out the cost of just one or two expensive cancer cases.

    In addition, the free coverage for preventive care in the ACA approved insurance will create higher claim costs all by itself, even among healthy persons.

    Now, there is supposedly $20 billion set aside for the insurers to cover early adverse selection. It may not be nearly enough?

  2. 

    Do you think this problem will show itself first at the entry level positions in Quick Serve Restaurant industry?

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